Pathology Today

newsletter

Pathology Today, May 28, 2014

How DNA is 'edited' to correct genetic diseases
Science Daily
A major step forward in our understanding of how enzymes "edit" genes has been made by an international team of researchers, paving the way for correcting genetic diseases in patients. Researchers have observed the process by which a class of enzymes called CRISPR — pronounced "crisper" — bind and alter the structure of DNA. The results provide a vital piece of the puzzle if these genome editing tools are ultimately going to be used to correct genetic diseases in humans.

Read More

newsletter

Pathology Today, May 14, 2014

Brief formalin fixation and rapid tissue processing do not affect the sensitivity of ER immunohistochemistry of breast core biopsies
American Journal of Clinical Pathology via Medscape
The decision to initiate treatment for patients with breast cancer is based on the results of tissue biomarker studies including estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Breast core needle biopsy specimens are now the primary source for the performance of these tests, particularly if neoadjuvant therapy is being considered. Preanalytic variables may affect the accuracy of ER, PR, and HER2 results.

Read More

Pages